Kids Common health issues

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Tips for healthy skin

Chickenpox is a common and usually mild childhood illness that can also occur at any stage of life. The illness can be associated with severe complications and even death so must be treated seriously in all cases.Immunisation can help prevent the spread of chickenpox.Chickenpox causes a rash of red, itchy spots that turn into fluid-filled blisters. They then crust over to form scabs, which eventually drop off.

Coughs, colds and ear infections in children

In children cough is a common symptom which is commonly caused by a cold. Usually a cough gets better on its own and is not serious. If your child is feeding, drinking, eating and breathing normally and there’s no wheezing, a cough isn’t usually anything to worry about.If your child has a bad cough that won’t go away, see your doctor. Causes of a more serious cough in children can include

It is normal for a preschool child to have at least 6 or more colds a year. This is because there are hundreds of different cold viruses and young children have no immunity to any of them as they've never had them before. Gradually they build up immunity and get fewer colds.Antibiotics don’t help with colds as they are a viral illness. Most colds get better in 5 to 7 days. Here are some suggestions on how to ease the symptoms in your child.

It is normal for a preschool child to have at least 6 or more colds a year. This is because there are hundreds of different cold viruses and young children have no immunity to any of them as they've never had them before. Gradually they build up immunity and get fewer colds.Antibiotics don’t help with colds as they are a viral illness. Most colds get better in 5 to 7 days. Here are some suggestions on how to ease the symptoms in your child.

Ear infections are common in babies and small children. They often follow a cold and sometimes cause a temperature. A child may pull or rub at an ear, but babies can’t always tell where pain is coming from and may just cry and seem uncomfortable.

Croup

Croup is a viral infection that causes swelling of the windpipe (trachea), the airways to the lungs (the bronchi) and the vocal cords (voice box). This swelling makes the airway narrower, so it is harder to breathe.

Croup can usually be diagnosed by a doctor and treated at home. Your doctor will diagnose croup after taking your child’s history and examining your child.

Diarrhoea and vomiting in children

It can be very concerning to see your baby or child having bouts of diarrhoea and vomiting. This helpful information aims to explain some of the common causes and strategies to help you alleviate your child’s symptoms.

Most babies have occasional loose stools or faeces (poo) and breastfed babies normally have looser stools than formula-fed babies.Diarrhoea in a baby describes frequent, repeated passing of unformed, watery stools.

Some children between the ages of one and five pass frequent, smelly, loose stools that may contain recognisable foods, such as carrots and peas. Usually, these children are otherwise perfectly healthy and are growing normally. The diarrhoea may be due to drinking too much cordial or sugary drinks, but you should check with your doctor. Sometimes the doctor can’t find any cause.

Fever and high temperatures in children

A fever is a temperature of 38°C or higher. Fever is one of the ways the body fights infection.It can develop slowly, over a few days, or the fever can rise very quickly. Usually, this doesn't have anything to do with the illness that causes the fever.If your child's face feels hot to the touch and they look red or flushed, then they may have a fever. You can check their temperature with a thermometer.

A normal temperature in children is 36.5°C to 37.5°C although it depends on the person, their age, what they have been doing, the time of day and at which part of the body you take the temperature.Body temperature is usually lowest in the early hours of the morning and highest in the late afternoon and early evening.

Asthma

We all know that asthma, just like seasonal allergies, tends to flare up in spring. Pollen, insect repellants, and air temperature changes are just some of the things that can trigger asthma in spring. If you have trouble controlling your asthma and use your rescue inhaler more than twice a week, make sure you talk to your doctor. Experts advise always having a peak flow meter with you, so that you can measure how well air moves out of your lungs.Be prepared for any of these issues and make sure you’re ready to act in case you notice signs of any of them. Only that way will you be able to enjoy a healthy start to the season.

Food allergies in children

Babies are more likely to develop allergies if there's a history of eczema , asthma , hay fever or food allergies (known together as 'atopy') in the family.It's recommended that when your infant is ready, at around 6 months, but not before 4 months, start to introduce a variety of solid foods, starting with iron rich foods, while continuing breastfeeding. Hydrolysed (partially and extensively) infant formula are not recommended for prevention of allergic disease.

Sunburn

With summer comes the danger of sunburn, which can be extremely serious. Sunburn is caused by ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun that damage your skin cells. The risk of damage depends on things like the time of day, the amount of time spent in the sun and if you use sun protection or not.

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